Tuesday, August 15, 2006

MOVIES I HAVE TO WATCH, PART TWO

I came across another movie that falls into this category while flipping around the HBO channels today when I was eating my lunch (Honey Bunches of Oats, yeah!) - "Wayne's World." It falls into the catergory of only watching for 10 or 15 minutes, especially if it's close to the Garth/"Foxy Lady" or "Bohemian Rhapsody" scenes. Or the end of the movie. It's not exactly a comedy classic but the original release caught me at the right time (I was 21 and a big fan of that particular cast of "SNL" and the Wayne's World skits on the show...the one with Madonna is a classic) and the things I enjoyed about it back then are things I can still enjoy now, whether I still find them funny or just have nostalgia for finding them funny, if you know what I mean. Party on!

Update: In the comments of the first installment of this scintillating series, my brother challenged me to watch "Rudy" and not cry at the end. Well, Jill and I caught the movie about a half hour in last week and decided to stick with it. Wow, what a bad movie. Sean Astin's character, the titular Rudy, really seems like he has mental problems. He's driven but he's not very bright about it. Sure, it's kinda cool to see him achieve his dream but no tears in sight for me. Sorry, Theron.

7 comments:

Trevor Jackson said...

You're not the only one who thinks Wayne's World is a classic. I'm less a fan of Dana Carvey, but I agree that this movie is criminally underrated.

theron said...

No need to apologize, bro. Perhaps I built it up too much so that you had a certain level of expectation. Yeah, Astin's character isn't too bright, and only wants that one thing. But you live in Indiana, and I know you know people with that type of mentality. I guess it doesn't work for you because you don't care about the character of Rudy. If you care, the scene where the team starts coming into the coach's office and laying their shirts on his desk is what gets you. And by you I mean me. Samwise Gamgee, we hardly knew ye.

tom said...

I don't cry for Rudy either, but I find it hard to turn it when I pass it flipping through the channels.

Die Hard and Dogma are my ultimate weaknesses though. I don't know why but even the power of hideous commercials can't make me turn the channel when I see 'em.
I was watching Dogma in the hospital while my wife was in the bathroom with the final labor pains of pushing out baby Zoey, in fact.

Anonymous said...

I'm like Tom in that I find it hard to pass Rudy up if it's on, but find the biggest problem I have with the movie is that all of the characters are too one-dimensional - Rudy -ND Football or death // Favreau's character is all party // Rudy's brother is all prick // etc.

Glad to see there's one other person out there that wouldn't have dropped and kissed Carvey's feet when he was on SNL - in my mind, one of the most overrated SNL performers ever. Not that he was horrible - but he just wasn't ever THAT funny in my mind.

Dan Wickett -EWN

theron said...

I remember loving Dana Carvey on SNL when I was younger. The Wayne's World sketches, the Church Lady, Hans & Franz, his Bush impression, the "Chopping Broccoli" sketch.

Now I'm trying to think about overrated SNL performers. Jimmy Fallon immediately springs to mind. I would also include Chris Rock.

Lady Crumpet said...

Justin - please get in touch when you have a chance. You can reach me at ladycrumpet@gmail.com

Justin said...

I was more scared of Rudy than anything, Theron. Your mentioning Samwise Gamgee compels me to confess that "Return of the King" makes me cry in a couple places.

Tom, the first Die Hard is a great movie. Dogma? I've only seen it the one time and while I liked it, I have to desire to watch it again.

Dan and Trevor, I'm with my brother on Dana Carvey. He was in a lot of great sketches back in the day and I always found him entertaining. Wish I'd paid more attention to his 90s variety show - that writing staff was amazing. Theron, my wife, and I once saw Carvey taping a Letterman segment on the streets of New York. Man, is he short.